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Wednesday, May 16, 2007

History throughout photographs

I Got this Photographs through email and i think its worth sharing
The Syrian University in 1925.
The Marjeh Square in downtown Damascus before World War I. In 1911, the monument in the middle was erected, and in 1916, Marjeh became a historic landmark when the Ottoman Turks executed 21 Arab nationalists there for defying the Ottoman Empire.
The Hijaz Railway Station in Damascus during World War I. The station was not build until after 1912 but the Damascus-Medina railroad had been created in 1908. The Hijaz Station has been designed by the Spanish architect Fernando de Aranda, who combined Western and Oriental elements. The building is still considered one of the most beautiful in Syria.
The Hamidiyyeh Market in Old Damascus in 1890, named after Sultan Abdulhamid II.
The Rabwa Road in Damascus during the early 1920s.
The Salhiyyieh Street in downtown Damascus during the Ottoman Era.

A barber shop in old Damascus. This picture was taken in 1900.
General Yusuf al-Azma (1883-1920), the Minister of War and Chief-of-Staff under King Faysal in 1918-1920.
A photograph of an American tourist in Syria in 1870. The American Flag is hoisted over his caravan.
Syrian coins during the era of King Faysal I (1918-1920).
The Azm Palace in Damascus, set ablaze by the French air raid on October 18, 1925.


New 08-2005: Syrian schoolchildren in New York during World War I, in 1914.
Students rioting at Damascus University in 1925.
Medical students at Damascus University in the 1920s.
The Ottoman Army led by pipers marching through Damascus on July 23,1917 as part of the Ottoman-German alliance during World War I.

A Syrian shop on Washington street in New York City in August 1920. The picture shows the Syrian shop owners selling "maarouk," a local bread usually popular during Ramdan
to Syrian and American customers.


3 comments:

MQabbani said...

Wow , really nice

thanks for sharing :)

Highlander said...

What beautiful photos. Unbelievable to see the Salhiye like this - it is still recognizable you know :)

Soraya said...

:) glad to see u here highlander

mqabbani im glad you've liked'em

cheerz